Fanny Littmarck | August 3, 2012

One of our Certified Consultants, Dr. Roger Pryor, wrote a book about “Multiphysics Modeling using COMSOL 4” in February this year. The book covers multiphysics problems ranging from relatively easy to relatively difficult, from 1D to 3D. Now, Dr. Pryor’s book on COMSOL version 4 is used in his brand new COMSOL training series in Troy, MI.

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Niklas Rom | August 2, 2012

It has been some time since we’ve had the “Tips & Tricks” column in COMSOL News. Many people have asked me for tips on how to use COMSOL Multiphysics, so I figured I would share some with you here on the blog. The first in this new series of tips and tricks explains how you can create high-resolution images of COMSOL models.

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Fanny Littmarck | August 1, 2012

If you’ve been keeping up with the blog you’ll have noticed our coverage on Toyota’s story on cooling the electronic components of their hybrid cars. This article was featured as a cover story in IEEE Spectrum’s Multiphysics Simulation insert, as well as in COMSOL News. Now we are thrilled to announce that the Principal Scientist at Toyota Research Institute of North America is going to be speaking at the COMSOL Conference in Boston this October.

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Bethany Moatts | July 31, 2012

Are you getting the most out of your simulations? There’s a wealth of options for creating plots and animations and for computing and exporting data in COMSOL, odds are you will find some neat features here. We want to get you off to a good start, so I’ve begun a series of tutorial videos covering a wide variety of topics in postprocessing. This tutorial series is suited for new and experienced users alike. You will get to learn the basics […]

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Valerio Marra | July 30, 2012

All this talk about piezoelectricity got me thinking about how surrounded we are by everyday items whose performances rely on this physical process. Examples include inkjet printers, speakers, electric guitars, and ultrasound imaging systems. With so many different common objects utilizing this phenomenon, it may lead you to wonder: what is piezoelectricity?

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Fanny Littmarck | July 27, 2012

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing as it is more widely known as, is on everybody’s mind right now. Manufacturing folks, engineers, and even the general public have taken an interest in 3D printing. In other words, this is not just a fascinating phenomenon to those in the industry — additive manufacturing has been generally accepted as the next “cool” thing in manufacturing.

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Phil Kinnane | July 26, 2012

Much has been written lately about increasing the energy efficiency of cars. Batteries and fuel cells are very hot topics, and not so long ago I blogged about the University of Michigan’s use of solar cells to fully power a car. Yet, even on the smallest of scales, such as the sensors in your car, improvements are being made. Utilizing a MEMS (Micro Electromechanical System) piezoelectric energy harvester, Alexander Frej and Ingo Kuehne at Siemens Corporate Technology in Munich are […]

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Valerio Marra | July 25, 2012

As Program Chair of the COMSOL Conference in Milan this year, I’m excited to announce that Marco Cati will be a keynote speaker presenting his design and optimization of ultrasound imaging systems at his company, Esaote S.p.A..

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Phil Kinnane | July 24, 2012

Looking for a tutorial on how to model a MEMS problem? We have recently added a video tutorial using the example of how to simulate a capacitive pressure sensor to our video gallery. For a brief overview of what you can model in the MEMS Module watch the trailer below, or go straight to the bottom of this post for a link to download the model files, which show how to produce this type of electromechanics model.

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Phil Kinnane | July 23, 2012

How do you simplify a 3D geometry to reduce the computational resources required to model it? Do it in 2D. What if the phenomenon can only be properly simulated in 3D? Find the planes of symmetry and reduce the size, most engineering objects are symmetric in some way. What if there is no symmetry, such as the propagation of random cracks through a steel pipe? Well, as this story from COMSOL News shows, there are other methods, such as using […]

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Fanny Littmarck | July 20, 2012

The most common type of aortic aneurysms is that which occurs in the abdominal region. When a person experiences an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), his or her abdominal aorta is dilated to the extent that its diameter is increased by over 50%. With symptoms lacking a sense of urgency (we’ve all ignored stomach pains before), if left untreated an AAA may rupture — whereon the victim’s life is on the line. An Intra-Luminal Thrombus is typically involved in AAAs, but […]

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